Memory loss biomarkers aid in diagnosis

Measure them with the eVox® System to reveal what the brain is hiding

Uncover more below

The Memory Loss Conundrum

Upwards of 20% of those age 65+ already have detectable symptoms of mild cognitive impairment.

DIAGNOSING MEMORY LOSS CAN BE CHALLENGING

  • Diagnosed too late

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is delayed on average 2-3 years after symptom onset 1,2.

  • Misdiagnosed

    Up to 1 in 5 patients diagnosed with probable AD during their lifetime did not have AD pathology at autopsy 3.

  • Underdiagnosed

    ~50% of patients with any form of dementia are not formally diagnosed 4.

There is a better way

Discover The Modern Way of 
Differential Diagnosis

Diagnostic accuracy of cognitive screeners

Current tools in primary care and specialist settings have poor sensitivity5.

Poor sensitivity means many diagnoses are missed.

9% Sensitivity in detecting MCI*
Sensitivity
Specificity

MMSE: Mini-Mental State Examination
VFT: Verbal Fluency Test
CDT: Clock Drawing Test

*In a study assessing the combination of cognitive screeners for the evaluation of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the elderly

How can you know what is happening in the brain unless you look?

“Clinical evaluation along with other supportive diagnostic techniques, such as […] functional neuroimaging, may be necessary to substantiate the diagnosis of MCI and the subsequent risk of developing AD5.”

Discover memory loss biomarkers

Memory Loss Biomarkers

The eVox System measures memory loss biomarkers that may aid physicians in identifying the root cause of memory loss, detecting memory loss & MCI sooner, and performing a differential diagnosis.

COGNITIVE CAPACITY

Assesses physiological aging and memory performance

BRAIN PROCESSING SPEED

Indicates speed for cognitive processes like decision making, attention, and memory 10-12.

BRAIN ACTIVITY

Allows for early detection of memory loss and MCI 13-14.

The eVox® System Aids in Diagnosis

Clinically Valuable

Medical device FDA 510(k) cleared to aids in diagnosis

Reimbursable

$739 Medicare national average 20186

In Your Office

Assess brain health, in your office

It’s time to act

TIMELY DIAGNOSIS WITH eVOX® MAKES A DIFFERENCE

HELPING YOU

HELPING YOUR PATIENTS

Detect Early
Brain health biomarkers detect memory loss sooner

Objective
eVox reveals clear biological underpinnings of symptoms

Intervene Early
eVox may facilitate differential diagnosis, which means more time for a successful intervention

Easy
eVox takes less than 45 minutes and is non-invasive

In Your Office
eVox requires no prior neuroscience expertise and is easily executed by an MA or office staff

Questions Answered
eVox may lead to a more accurate and timely diagnosis

IT’S TIME TO ACT

Providing the best care for your memory loss patients includes a brain function assessment. The eVox System makes it easy.

Contact us

Learn more about eVox®

We are happy to provide you with additional information! Please call us at 917-261-6096 or complete the form below


* Asterisk denotes required field.


I am interested in:

Your role:

References:

Intended Use. The eVox system is a Class II medical device that has received Section 510(K) clearance from the FDA. It is intended for the acquisition, display, and storage, of electrical activity of a patient’s brain including electroencephalograph (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERP) obtained by placing two or more electrodes on the head to aid in diagnosis. The eVox System has the added capability to be used as a biofeedback device, where such an intervention is indicated. Doctors should use their professional judgement in determining when the eVox System is appropriate to aid in diagnosis.

  1. Boise L, Morgan DL, Kaye J, Camicioli R. Delays in the diagnosis of dementia: perspectives of family caregivers. Am J Alzheimers Dis. 1999;14:20-26.
  2. Balasa M, Gelpi E, Antonell A, et al; for the Neurological Tissue Bank/University of Barcelona/Hospital Clinic NTB/UB/HC Collaborative Group. Clinical features and APOE genotype of pathologically proven early-onset Alzheimer disease. Neurology. 2011;76(20):1720-1725.
  3. Beach TG, Monsell SE, Phillips LE, Kukull W. Accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease at National Institute on Aging Alzheimer Disease Centers, 2005–2010. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2012;71(4):266-273.
  4. Boustani M, Peterson B, Hanson L, Harris R, Lohr KN. Screening for dementia in primary care: a summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med. 2003;138(11):927-937.
  5. Ladeira RB, et al. 2009;64(10):967-73.
  6. 2018 NATIONAL AVERAGE MEDICARE PHYSICIAN FEE SCHEDULE, NON FACILITY SETTING https://cms.gov/apps/physician-fee-schedule/overview.aspx. Payment Policies Under the Physician Fee Schedule and Other Revisions to Part B for CY 2018 Final Rule. Note that the non-facility setting Medicare national average for 2018 is $924 when any applicable coinsurance, deductible, and other amounts that are patient obligations are included.
  7. Dujardin K, Bourriez JL, Guieu JD. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) patterns during memory processes: effects of aging and task difficulty. Electroencephalog Clin Neurophysiol, 1995;96(2):169–182.
  8. Klass DW, Brenner RP. Electroencephalography of the elderly.J Clin Neurophysio, 1995;12(2):116–131.
  9. Klimesch W. EEG alpha and theta oscillations reflect cognitive and memory performance: A review and analysis. Brain Res Rev, 1999;29(2-3):169–195.
  10. Polich J, Corey-Bloom J. Alzheimer’s disease and P300: Review and evaluation of task and modality. Curr Alzheimer Res, 2005;2(5):515–525.
  11. Polich J. Updating P300: An integrative theory of P3a and P3b. Clin Neurophysiol, 2007;118(1):2128-2148.
  12. Pfurtscheller G, Lopes da Silva FH. Event-related EEG/MEG synchronization and desynchronization: brain principles. Clin Neurophysiol, 1999;110(11):1842–57.
  13. Terry JR, Anderson C, Horne JA. Nonlinear analysis of EEG during NREM sleep reveals changes in functional connectivity due to natural aging. Human Brain Mapping, 2004;23(2):73–84.
  14. Babiloni C, Binetti G, Cassarino A, et al. Sources of cortical rhythms in adults during physiological aging: A multicentric EEG study. Human Brain Mapping, 2005;27(2):162–172.

Memory loss biomarkers aid in diagnosis

Measure them with the eVox® System to reveal what the brain is hiding

The Memory Loss Conundrum

Upwards of 20% of those age 65+ already have detectable symptoms of mild cognitive impairment.

DIAGNOSING MEMORY LOSS CAN BE CHALLENGING

  • Diagnosed too late

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is delayed on average 2-3 years after symptom onset 1,2.

  • Misdiagnosed

    Up to 1 in 5 patients diagnosed with probable AD during their lifetime did not have AD pathology at autopsy 3.

  • Underdiagnosed

    ~50% of patients with any form of dementia are not formally diagnosed 4.

Discover The Modern Way of Differential Diagnosis

Current tools in primary care and specialist settings have poor sensitivity5.

Poor sensitivity means many diagnoses are missed.

Diagnostic accuracy of cognitive screeners

9% Sensitivity in detecting MCI*

SensitivitySpecificity

MMSE: Mini-Mental State Examination
VFT: Verbal Fluency Test
CDT: Clock Drawing Test

*In a study assessing the combination of cognitive screeners for the evaluation of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the elderly

How can you know what is happening in the brain unless you look?

“Clinical evaluation along with other supportive diagnostic techniques, such as […] functional neuroimaging, may be necessary to substantiate the diagnosis of MCI and the subsequent risk of developing AD5.”

Memory Loss Biomarkers

The eVox System measures memory loss biomarkers that may aid physicians in identifying the root cause of memory loss, detecting memory loss & MCI sooner, and performing a differential diagnosis.

COGNITIVE CAPACITY

Assesses physiological aging and memory performance

BRAIN PROCESSING SPEED

Indicates speed for cognitive processes like decision making, attention, and memory 10-12.

BRAIN ACTIVITY

Allows for early detection of memory loss and MCI 13-14.

The eVox® System Aids in Diagnosis

Clinically Valuable

Medical device FDA 510(k) cleared to aids in diagnosis

Reimbursable

$739 Medicare national average 20186

In Your Office

Assess brain health, in your office

TIMELY DIAGNOSIS WITH eVOX® MAKES A DIFFERENCE

HELPING YOU

Detect Early
Brain health biomarkers detect memory loss sooner

Intervene Early
eVox may facilitate differential diagnosis, which means more time for a successful intervention

In Your Office
eVox requires no prior neuroscience expertise and is easily executed by an MA or office staff

HELPING YOUR PATIENTS

Objective
eVox reveals clear biological underpinnings of symptoms

Easy
eVox takes less than 45 minutes and is non-invasive

Questions Answered
eVox may lead to a more accurate and timely diagnosis

IT’S TIME TO ACT

Providing the best care for your memory loss patients includes a brain function assessment. The eVox System makes it easy.

Learn more about eVox®

We are happy to provide you with additional information! Please call us at 917-261-6096 or complete the form below


* Asterisk denotes required field.


I am interested in:

Your role:

References:

Intended Use. The eVox system is a Class II medical device that has received Section 510(K) clearance from the FDA. It is intended for the acquisition, display, and storage, of electrical activity of a patient’s brain including electroencephalograph (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERP) obtained by placing two or more electrodes on the head to aid in diagnosis. The eVox System has the added capability to be used as a biofeedback device, where such an intervention is indicated. Doctors should use their professional judgement in determining when the eVox System is appropriate to aid in diagnosis.

  1. Boise L, Morgan DL, Kaye J, Camicioli R. Delays in the diagnosis of dementia: perspectives of family caregivers. Am J Alzheimers Dis. 1999;14:20-26.
  2. Balasa M, Gelpi E, Antonell A, et al; for the Neurological Tissue Bank/University of Barcelona/Hospital Clinic NTB/UB/HC Collaborative Group. Clinical features and APOE genotype of pathologically proven early-onset Alzheimer disease. Neurology. 2011;76(20):1720-1725.
  3. Beach TG, Monsell SE, Phillips LE, Kukull W. Accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease at National Institute on Aging Alzheimer Disease Centers, 2005–2010. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2012;71(4):266-273.
  4. Boustani M, Peterson B, Hanson L, Harris R, Lohr KN. Screening for dementia in primary care: a summary of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med. 2003;138(11):927-937.
  5. Ladeira RB, et al. 2009;64(10):967-73.
  6. 2018 NATIONAL AVERAGE MEDICARE PHYSICIAN FEE SCHEDULE, NON FACILITY SETTING https://cms.gov/apps/physician-fee-schedule/overview.aspx. Payment Policies Under the Physician Fee Schedule and Other Revisions to Part B for CY 2018 Final Rule. Note that the non-facility setting Medicare national average for 2018 is $924 when any applicable coinsurance, deductible, and other amounts that are patient obligations are included.
  7. Dujardin K, Bourriez JL, Guieu JD. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) patterns during memory processes: effects of aging and task difficulty. Electroencephalog Clin Neurophysiol, 1995;96(2):169–182.
  8. Klass DW, Brenner RP. Electroencephalography of the elderly.J Clin Neurophysio, 1995;12(2):116–131.
  9. Klimesch W. EEG alpha and theta oscillations reflect cognitive and memory performance: A review and analysis. Brain Res Rev, 1999;29(2-3):169–195.
  10. Polich J, Corey-Bloom J. Alzheimer’s disease and P300: Review and evaluation of task and modality. Curr Alzheimer Res, 2005;2(5):515–525.
  11. Polich J. Updating P300: An integrative theory of P3a and P3b. Clin Neurophysiol, 2007;118(1):2128-2148.
  12. Pfurtscheller G, Lopes da Silva FH. Event-related EEG/MEG synchronization and desynchronization: brain principles. Clin Neurophysiol, 1999;110(11):1842–57.
  13. Terry JR, Anderson C, Horne JA. Nonlinear analysis of EEG during NREM sleep reveals changes in functional connectivity due to natural aging. Human Brain Mapping, 2004;23(2):73–84.
  14. Babiloni C, Binetti G, Cassarino A, et al. Sources of cortical rhythms in adults during physiological aging: A multicentric EEG study. Human Brain Mapping, 2005;27(2):162–172.